6 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queuereview queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

Why can't I fix a typo?

This edit should not have been approved

When a user changes your edits back to their original, pre-edit form

The Review Queue II: This Time It's Personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

Why can't I fix a typo?

This edit should not have been approved

When a user changes your edits back to their original, pre-edit form

The Review Queue II: This Time It's Personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

Why can't I fix a typo?

This edit should not have been approved

When a user changes your edits back to their original, pre-edit form

The Review Queue II: This Time It's Personal

5 replaced http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4908/why-cant-i-fix-a-typoWhy can't I fix a typo?

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4743/this-edit-should-not-have-been-approvedThis edit should not have been approved

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1636/when-a-user-changes-your-edits-back-to-their-original-pre-edit-form?rq=1When a user changes your edits back to their original, pre-edit form

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3466/the-review-queue-ii-this-time-its-personalThe Review Queue II: This Time It's Personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4908/why-cant-i-fix-a-typo

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4743/this-edit-should-not-have-been-approved

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1636/when-a-user-changes-your-edits-back-to-their-original-pre-edit-form?rq=1

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3466/the-review-queue-ii-this-time-its-personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

Why can't I fix a typo?

This edit should not have been approved

When a user changes your edits back to their original, pre-edit form

The Review Queue II: This Time It's Personal

4 deleted 11 characters in body
source | link

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I have spottedspot a poor edit, I triedtry to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to roll backrollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4908/why-cant-i-fix-a-typo

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4743/this-edit-should-not-have-been-approved

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1636/when-a-user-changes-your-edits-back-to-their-original-pre-edit-form?rq=1

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3466/the-review-queue-ii-this-time-its-personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I have spotted a poor edit, I tried to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to roll back. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4908/why-cant-i-fix-a-typo

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4743/this-edit-should-not-have-been-approved

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1636/when-a-user-changes-your-edits-back-to-their-original-pre-edit-form?rq=1

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3466/the-review-queue-ii-this-time-its-personal

Every so often I see an edit that has been approved by the community, which I consider either inaccurate, misleading, or worse of all, actually harmful to the OP. When I look back at the history in the review queue, the users who have approved these poor edits are either non-native speakers, or largely inexperienced.

Of course everyone makes a slip-up now and again; we all do, and that's why a newcomer's suggested edit is approved by two users who have earned these moderator's privileges.

But I'm beginning to think this is not sufficient. Whenever I spot a poor edit, I try to rectify it, but this is a delicate operation. I risk offending the newcomer whose edit was approved, and I risk looking like a fuss-pot, or worse.

Am I alone in thinking this is a "problem"? Perhaps I should flag and wait for a mod to rollback. I think this type of intervention looks better done by them.

Just to give visitors an idea of what I'm talking about:

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4908/why-cant-i-fix-a-typo

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/4743/this-edit-should-not-have-been-approved

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1636/when-a-user-changes-your-edits-back-to-their-original-pre-edit-form?rq=1

http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3466/the-review-queue-ii-this-time-its-personal

3 Edited "slip up" to "slip-up", "rollback" to "roll back". Revised some comma usage.
source | link
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackEnglish/status/595710792546254848
2 added 476 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link