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4 replaced http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.meta.stackexchange.com/
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It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that they should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitraryarbitrary, too complex and subjectivecomplex and subjective to be authoritative, and more culturalcultural than linguistic. Like proofreadingproofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that they should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitrary, too complex and subjective to be authoritative, and more cultural than linguistic. Like proofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that they should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitrary, too complex and subjective to be authoritative, and more cultural than linguistic. Like proofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

3 added 2 characters in body
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It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that itthey should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitrary, too complex and subjective to be authoritative, and more cultural than linguistic. Like proofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that it should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitrary, too complex and subjective to be authoritative, and more cultural than linguistic. Like proofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

It depends.

If you are essentially asking, "What do you think about some name?", then yes, it's off topic at ELU. The name is predominant, and this is just naming by another name.

The basic criterion for Stack Exchange posts is that they should have some authoritative reference value (to someone else) after the question's poster has been satisfied. Naming is traditionally seen as too arbitrary, too complex and subjective to be authoritative, and more cultural than linguistic. Like proofreading, naming is also considered to be too specific to be of interest to others.

But if by your phrase "asking if a name of a product is bad" you mean that you produce a name and want to talk about its connotations, etymology, etc as a word, then that's just talking about the English language, and hence on-topic. In this latter case, it's irrelevant that the word happens to be a name.

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