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Is there a word in English for a man who leaves his pregnant wife and child?

Similar, highly-rated questions do exist, and it seems no more or less specific than those, so I can't understand why this one in particular was closed.

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Because there are many words for someone who does something like this. A few that quickly to mind include:

  • abusive
  • asshole
  • bad-mannered
  • barbarian
  • barbaric
  • barbarous
  • beachcomber
  • blackguard
  • boor
  • boorish
  • borrower
  • bounder
  • brash
  • brusque
  • brutish
  • bum
  • cad
  • capricious
  • cheeky
  • churl
  • churlish
  • clown
  • creep
  • criminal
  • crook
  • crude
  • culprit
  • cur
  • dawdler
  • deadbeat
  • derelict
  • desperado
  • devil
  • dog
  • do-nothing
  • evil
  • feckless
  • fickle
  • flighty
  • fly-by-night
  • freeloader
  • good-for-nothing
  • goof-off
  • graceless
  • heedless
  • heel
  • hobo
  • hoodlum
  • idler
  • ignorant
  • ill-considered
  • immature
  • immoral
  • imp
  • impertinent
  • impolite
  • impudent
  • inattentive
  • incautious
  • inconsiderate
  • indelicate
  • indifferent
  • indiscreet
  • insensitive
  • insolent
  • jerk
  • laggard
  • lawbreaker
  • lax
  • layabout
  • lazybones
  • leech
  • loafer
  • loose
  • lounger
  • louse
  • lout
  • loutish
  • lowlife
  • maggot
  • malefactor
  • malingerer
  • mendicant
  • miscreant
  • moocher
  • ne'er-do-well
  • neglecter
  • neglectful
  • negligent
  • no-account
  • obscene
  • outlaw
  • panhandler
  • peremptory
  • primitive
  • quitter
  • rake
  • rascal
  • rash
  • rat
  • reckless
  • reprobate
  • rotter
  • rounder
  • rude
  • runaway
  • rustler
  • scalawag
  • scamp
  • scoundrel
  • scrounger
  • scurrilous
  • self-centered
  • selfish
  • shiftless
  • shirker
  • slacker
  • sloth
  • slouch
  • sluggard
  • sponger
  • stinker
  • supplicant
  • thoughtless
  • tramp
  • unaccountable
  • unanswerable
  • uncareful
  • uncaring
  • unceremonious
  • uncivil
  • uncivilized
  • unconcerned
  • uncouth
  • uncultured
  • undependable
  • ungracious
  • vagabond
  • villain
  • vulgar
  • wanderer
  • wretch

As with any other “sort of person” that we wish to badmouth, English offers no shortage of ways of calling other people bad names. These questions come up constantly, and they do not lead to single “correct” answers, just plenty of nasty things to say about other human beings.

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  • 16
    This is a ridiculous answer. No part of my answer implied that I was looking for an insult - I asked for a very specific word for a very specific scenario. If no such word exists, and therefore the answer to the question is "no", then it's up to me as the questioner to select the closest one posted as "best answer". Voting to close the question because you can rattle off a list of catch-all insults entirely unrelated to the context of the question asked is puerile. Mar 31 '17 at 0:53
  • @Hashim Then perhaps I shall have misunderstood you, but you asked me what I was thinking and I have told you exactly that.
    – tchrist Mod
    Mar 31 '17 at 0:58
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    If the question was "How do I insult a man who has left his wife and kids" this might be applicable, and I would suggest adding motherf—ker to the list because although it's mostly an insult for its incestuous connotations, it still seems descriptive in a strict sense. However, I very much think @Hashim means "Is there really no agent noun meaning a man who left his wife/kids". Would you be willing to reopen the question if he edited the question to reflect that? Although, I might add that wh*re isn't really so specific either.
    – Tonepoet
    Mar 31 '17 at 3:02
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    @Tonepoet I have reöpened it, but it should still be edited along the lines you've given: I was hardly the only one to read the question this way, and the deleted answers are even worse.
    – tchrist Mod
    Mar 31 '17 at 3:05
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    @Hashim a single-word that means a husband who leaves a wife and kids is never going to be complimentary, is it? By its very nature the "agent noun" has to be derogatory to match/convey society's disapproval.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Mar 31 '17 at 9:24
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    You left out 'roué'.
    – Mitch
    Mar 31 '17 at 13:40
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    @Mitch - If we're going to start listing omissions, I think Lothario is apt.
    – J.R.
    Apr 1 '17 at 11:08
  • tchrist's comment mentioning how people took the question ... is really the meta question here. Why do people so often look for pejorative terms when they dislike a behavior rather than a word describing the behavior itself ? I've seen any question looking for a word that suggests some level of spirituality, appreciation of myth etc leaped out at with synonyms for "delusional".... as if a person is looking for a judgement rather than a word that captures the intent of the one being described.
    – Tom22
    Apr 5 '17 at 0:36

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