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RE: “marked as duplicate by Mari-Lou A, Edwin Ashworth, tchrist♦, FumbleFingers, RegDwigнt♦ Aug 15 '14 at 14:08 This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.” . How do I ask a new question, and what should it be about? . Crap. That’s two questions isn’t it?

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  • If you don't know what your question is about, why ask (unless you are just trying to get reps)? Refer to the help center for further info. The help centre will also tell you how to earn reps. – Mick Jan 8 '18 at 14:13
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    If the answers to the “original” question don’t fully address your question, just make clear what your specific point is and possibly say why the previous answers don’t help with your request. There are questions which look similar on a superficial analysis, so explain clearly what you are looking for. – user067531 Jan 8 '18 at 15:30
  • You're writing about a question that was closed in 2014?! Can you please tell us what the question was, not necessarily every vote cast in favor of closure agrees with one another, there might have been three different reasons chosen to put the question on hold, and the one that got three "yeses" is the one that sticks. – Mari-Lou A Jan 8 '18 at 16:40
  • But if you just want to ask a completely different question, just go ahead. Make sure it hasn't already been asked at least twenty times before, i.e. "What do you call someone who uses long complicated words instead of short simple ones, and never seems to stop talking?" It seems we get that type of request three or four times a year. – Mari-Lou A Jan 8 '18 at 16:43
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In your new question, you should ask your new question (presumably with wording that distinguishes it from the prior question), and refer to the old question, and explain how it is not a duplicate. This will help the reader understand the nuances, and help prevent the from closing it as a duplicate.

It may turn out that the prior question in fact did cover what you're asking (but no answer supplied it). A new question would not be the right place for new or embellished answers to the the old question. That may be a reason for bumping the old question (many means for this), adding a comment requesting/emphasizing the additional nuance that you don't see in the given answers.

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    That’s correct, but I doubt that a comment to an old question would attract enough attention from users to give an appropriate answer. A comment don’t move a question to the top of the active list and it might just go unnoticed by most users. I don’t see the problem of making a fresh new question referring to the old one. – user067531 Jan 8 '18 at 15:46
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    @user159691 Right, a comment doesn't bump the question in visibility. As I said, bump it first ("many means for this"), then give a comment. – Mitch Jan 8 '18 at 16:15

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