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I'm new here, and want to ask a question about the questions. Would that be at "meta," and if so, how do I access it?

"Why are there so many already answered questions in the 'unanswered' section?"

marked as duplicate by JJJ, JonMark Perry, Chenmunka, TimLymington, Mitch Aug 7 at 13:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jul 31 at 20:02

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  • Of course, a side-effect of closure is that there will actually be a link to Meta... – Andrew Leach Jul 31 at 20:02

As the text on the "Unanswered Questions" tab explains, that listing is of questions with no upvoted or accepted answers:

questions with no upvoted or accepted answers

There may be questions which have therefore received one or more answers, but these answers have neither attracted the approval of the original poster or other members of the community. The system "bumps" those questions periodically in the hopes of attracting new attention.

There are also cases where the original poster receives an answer from elsewhere, or from a comment. The "question" is "answered," but in terms of the Stack Exchange system, unless an answer is posted in the Your Answer box and either accepted or upvoted, it may as well not exist.

  • I'm sorry, but I must be missing something: Unanswered Questions "text"? I find no such thing on my end. – Jerry A. Trik Jul 31 at 20:30
  • @JerryA.Trik I added the link and a screenshot of the box. – choster Jul 31 at 20:39
  • Much appreciated! – Jerry A. Trik Jul 31 at 20:42

For the first part of your question, yes: you should ask questions about the site on Meta.

You can access Meta more or less directly by clicking on the StackExchange icon at the far right of the top nav bar, and choosing your current site's Meta site that is listed directly underneath it.

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