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Wondering if there is an open data "verb list" of all (or many) of the English verbs. A search reveals many "Top 100 English Verbs" or "List of Irregular English Verbs" and related content, but I'm looking for a large list of say 10,000+ verbs if possible (just present tense is fine). I doubt there is a "complete" list, but something that collects as much as possible.

Basically I would like the top 10,000 (or more) verbs in English.

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  • Ok great, thank you for your kindness :) – Lance Pollard Sep 17 '18 at 19:46
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    Not a totally wild guess, but I expect that given the average adult has a vocabulary of ~30k (~70k for highly technical/literate people) and that the great majority of words are nouns, I think that too 10k is overkilll. Whatever your purposes are, I'd expect 5k or less will be more than sufficient. – Mitch Sep 17 '18 at 22:29
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    Funnily enough, the main Stack Overflow site gets questions about word lists like this, one good one tells you how to get a list of words of any part of speech. – Mitch Sep 18 '18 at 0:09
  • We also have Open Data with "english" tag. I'm not a regular of that site, but maybe that site could have some more love with this kind of questions? :) – Andrew T. Sep 18 '18 at 3:07
  • You can also make use of the Verb Index from Levin's English Verb Classes and Alternations – John Lawler Sep 26 '18 at 23:26
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The Oxford English Dictionary Online Advanced Search allows you to search by part-of-speech; a search for verbs returns 32,366 results. Confining the search to "senses marked as current" (as opposed to "obsolete") narrows the list to 22,209 results. I imagine that's as complete as you'll get.


Unfortunately, the OED is subscription-only, and it's fairly expensive. However, many institutions including virtually all public libraries in the UK and most higher-ed libraries in the US provide free access, so it is worth checking to see if you can access it through any library with which you are affiliated. (And if you act fast, there is a special subscription rate this year for the OED's 90th anniversary—good until the end of March, 2019.)

  • This isn't open source and there's no easy way to get the entire list of words. Doing it programmatically could get you in trouble, since some sites have rate limits or are on the lookout for suspicious activity. – Laurel Sep 29 '18 at 21:17
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The Moby Project's Part of Speech file is in the public domain, and you should not have any copyright concerns as a result (not technically open source, but you can "[u]se, sell, rework, excerpt and use in any way on any platform"). Instructions for the list can be found here. The list of words with parts of speech can be found here, and you will need to parse the list to get all the verbs, but that should be easy for anyone with any programming experience. Here's a regex that should work: ^([^\\]+\\[\S]*)[tVi]. You will need to use the global and multiline regex flags for it to work.

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