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The Wikipedia page for Initial-stress-derived noun says:

Initial-stress derivation is a phonological process in English that moves stress to the first syllable of verbs when they are used as nouns or adjectives. (This is an example of a suprafix.) This process can be found in the case of several dozen verb-noun and verb-adjective pairs and is gradually becoming more standardized in some English dialects, but it is not present in all. The list of affected words differs from area to area, and often depends on whether a word is used metaphorically or not. At least 170 verb-noun or verb-adjective pairs exist.

(emphasis added)

Is there a reasonably complete compilation of such words? The Wikipedia page only lists a handful, nowhere near 170. I'm most interested in American English.

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    I'm not sure I know why this post was migrated from the main page. Yes, it was asking for resources but knowing that resource would be more helpful to visitors and users alike on the main site than here. And asking about word stress in American English is very much on-topic there than here. – Mari-Lou A Jun 29 at 11:48
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Apparently the Wikipedia page previously had such a list, but it was removed on June 11:

absent · abstract · accent · access · addict · address · affect · affix · alloy · ally · annex · array · assay · attribute · augment · belay · bombard · combat · combine · commune · compact · complex · composite · compost · compound · compress · concert · conduct · confect · confine(s) · conflict · conscript · conserve · consist · console · consort · construct · consult · content · contest · contract · contrast · converse · convert · convict · costume · cushion · decrease · default · defect · desert · detail · dictate · digest · discard · discharge · discount · discourse · dismount · embed · envelope · escort · essay · excise · exploit · export · extract · ferment · finance · foretaste · foretoken · forward · frequent · gallant · impact · implant · impound · import · impress · imprint · incense · incline · increase · indent · inlay · insert · insult · intercept · interchange · intercross · interdict · interlink · interlock · intern · interplay · interspace · interweave · intrigue · invert · invite · involute · mandate · mentor · mismatch · misprint · object · offset · overcount · overlap · overlay · overlook · override · overrun · overturn · perfect · perfume · permit · pervert · prefix · present · proceed(s) · process · produce · progress · project · protest · purport · rebel · recall · recap · recess · recoil · record · re-count · redirect · redo · redress · refill · refresh · refund · refuse · regress · rehash · reject · relapse · relay · remake · repeat · reprint · research · reserve · reset · retake · retard · retract · retread · rewrite · segment · separate · subject · survey · suspect · torment · transfer · transform · transplant · transect · transport · transpose · traverse · undercount · underlay · underline · underscore · update · upgrade · uplift · upset

  • Thanks for adding that back in. I don't know the guidelines for Wikipedia, but maybe lists are weird and are supposed to be put in a separate place. But the previous editor should not have just deleted them and that's it. I would think that a link for each word to wikipedia where the two versions of stress are spelled out would be an extra good step too. That said, going through that list there are some classics (like convict the felon, and convict what the judge did to the felon), but a lot of them (eg all the 'under-' words, I don't see. – Mitch Jun 28 at 12:32
  • Doesn't mention police, insurance, umbrella, cigar, or cigarette. Those are stressed on the first syllable in every usage by some speakers. – John Lawler Jul 2 at 0:39
  • @JohnLawler I tried that but it sounds very odd. Which dialects do this? – marcellothearcane Aug 7 at 21:55
  • Here's a link with some information about dialectal first-syllable stress. And here's another. – John Lawler Aug 7 at 22:35

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