3

On EL&U it would sometimes be interesting to emphasize only one letter in the word (or just a part of the word), however attempting

cr**ust**

does not give

cr⁠ust

but

cr*ust*

(the results are even worse if you want to emphasize letter(s) within a word; the above "cr⁠ust"⁠ was achieved with unicode U+2060, an invisible character between square brackets here: ]⁠[ )

  • 4
    What we really need is a way to underline parts of words, but TPTB have an irrational fear of underlining. – Marthaª Jul 5 '11 at 14:59
  • @Marthaª StackExchange dislikes the whole idea of underlining. All there are ways of effecting u̲n̲d̲e̲r̲l̲i̲n̲e̲d̲ text using Unicode combining c̳h̳a̳r̳a̳c̳t̳e̳r̳s̳, web browsers are notoriously crappy at rendering these in the nicely typeset way one would expect of ᴇʟ&ᴜ. Well-typeset text and web browsers don’t even belong in the same room together, let alone within the same sentence. – tchrist Feb 17 '12 at 16:30
10

crust = cr<b>ust</b>

crust = cr<i>ust</i>

5

For questions and answers, remember that you can use HTML:

Crust, crust, crust, crust, crust, crust, etc.

Source:

  Cr<i>ust</i>, cr<b>ust</b>, cr<b><i>ust</i></b>, cr<sup>ust</sup>,
  cr<sub>ust</sub>, cr<sub><b>ust</b></sub>, etc.

There's also a formatting sandbox over at the meta Meta, where you can try stuff out (or look at all the stuff other people have tried out so far).

If we're talking comments, however, then I'm afraid you're out of luck.

2

The reason Markdown doesn't work is that is not allowed inside a word. In those cases, you can only use HTML tags, such as <strong></strong>, and <em></em>.

This is really easy, but I am sometimes lazy.
This is really e*asy*, but I am sometimes l_azy_.

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