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As a non-native English speaker I pronounce "bomb", "climb", "thumb" etc... with a clear B at the end. I know I shouldn't, but it's automatic.

So, I was interested in asking if native English speakers would understand such wrong pronunciation, or how weird it would sound... however, since listening comprehension is an individual phenomenon, such a question seems inherently opinion-based and therefore off topic. Is it possible to formulate a question regarding the comprehension of a wrong pronunciation without it being opinion-based?

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    That's not what 'opinion' is supposed to mean here. The whole SE user experience is created to allow multiple answers and perception is certainly one can have that. But of course not everyone here follows that and it may well be closed. Any answer here is an attempt at being universal (one person attempting to answer as an authority for many people).
    – Mitch
    Oct 30 '20 at 12:53
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    A non-opinionated (but possibly wrong) answer would be something like "English doesn't pronounce the 'b' word-final spelling '-mb'. If a native speaker -hears- the 'b', they won't misunderstand the word because there are no pairs of words where the b is pronounced or not. It -does- sound strange to the native speaker, it just won't be misunderstood ".
    – Mitch
    Oct 30 '20 at 12:56
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    English is a little more forgiving with mispronunciations than other languages, in my experience. For example, in Spanish, if pan is not nasalized, and pronounced like a native English speaker would, it is usually not understood. On the other hand, even though my native-Spanish speaking wife pronounces bread with a final /ð/ (sounds like "breadth"), it is still understood from the context.
    – Cascabel
    Nov 3 '20 at 17:03

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