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The question Where does the use of "deck" to mean "set of slides" come from? shows research. However, it was closed with the reason "Please include the research you’ve done". Why?

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  • From the etymonline link posted, Sense extended early in English from "covering" to "platform of a ship." Meaning "pack of cards necessary to play a game" is from 1590s, perhaps because they were stacked like decks of a ship. (AND) Tape-deck (1949) is in* reference to the flat surface of old reel-to-reel tape recorders – Mari-Lou A Mar 19 at 21:53
  • @Mari-LouA I didn't think of a PowerPoint presentation as a pack of cards. – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 19 at 21:55
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    Research is not just posting a link, even if that is a huge improvement to the vast majority of questions posted. – Mari-Lou A Mar 19 at 21:55
  • upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/… Note how an 18th century ship decks are "stacked" one on top of another. – Mari-Lou A Mar 19 at 22:08
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    It's been reopened – Mitch Mar 20 at 14:11
  • Note that 4 out of the 5 CVs were cast before the link to Etymonline was added (showing minimal research effort) . The last CV was actually cast much later when the question was already in the hotlist, probably on traction of the other CVs. – user 66974 Mar 20 at 15:37
  • @user66974 the OP may have posted a link, but they didn't read the information contained in the entry. The text, see my comment above, actually explains why a set of slides are called a deck. – Mari-Lou A Mar 23 at 11:43
  • @Mari-LouA I did read it but didn't think of a PowerPoint presentation as a pack of cards. – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 23 at 11:44
  • What did you think "a set of slides" meant? – Mari-Lou A Mar 23 at 11:47
  • @Mari-LouA a document with smaller pages, often designed to support a speaker. – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 23 at 11:49
  • That's called "(speaker) notes" – Mari-Lou A Mar 23 at 11:51
  • @Mari-LouA speaker notes are typically private, slides are typically publicly shown, and both support the speaker. – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 23 at 11:53
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    Look, you posted a question consisting of a single line. Then you were prompted to add the Etymonline link, but you simply said it did not shed any light. When it actually did. I would describe the post as an example of lack of effort, if the user who posted it were "new" I would not mind. It's normal for newcomers to write short questions. But you've been around SE far longer than I, and you have asked far more questions across the network than I. You should know better, and you should openly admit you didn't do any real research, rather than moan about your question getting closed. – Mari-Lou A Mar 23 at 11:58
  • @Mari-LouA what other comment you wanted me to write about the Etymonline link? – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 23 at 12:00
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    Fine. No one on EL&U has ever been sued for misuse when the source has been correctly attributed and cited. Let's leave it alone, shall we? I will. – Mari-Lou A Mar 23 at 12:09
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I'll summarize the answers the question received in the comments: 1) The question has been reopened. 2) the last close voter didn't think but instead just simply followed the previous close votes.

  • It's been reopened – Mitch yesterday
  • Note that 4 out of the 5 CVs were cast before the link to Etymonline was added (showing minimal research effort) . The last CV was actually cast much later when the question was already in the hotlist, probably on traction of the other CVs. – user 66974 yesterday 

As a side note, most non-closed questions on this website do not show any research and the close reason is applied very much arbitrarily.

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