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English Language & Usage

OR

English Language & its Usage

I think its should be there..

What do you think masters of English language?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jul 17 '13 at 13:42

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

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    As written, it parses as “English Language and English Usage,” which sounds fine. – Bradd Szonye Jul 17 '13 at 11:01
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    Off topic (proofreading request), not constructive (proofreading the Internet, peeving). If there is a specific word or construction you want expert help to understand, please edit to show prior research and rephrase the question. – MetaEd Jul 17 '13 at 11:28
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    As well as what Bradd says, titles get to elide words in all manner of ways. – Matt E. Эллен Jul 17 '13 at 14:03
  • don't think in manner of this title I just used another way so I need your help that what I should write? is my english correct? but why downvote> where is my mistake? – Java D Jul 18 '13 at 4:53
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    @JavaD I believe your question is being downvoted because it is ambiguous and poorly presented. Users might be expressing their objection to your criticism of the website's name. If you are not criticizing the name then I suggest you rephrase your question and post it to English Language Learners. ell.stackexchange.com – Mari-Lou A Jul 21 '13 at 5:53
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    @Bradd actually it does not sound fine to me. As a matter of public record, it never did. I'm with the OP on this one. It sounds like "Car audio and installation". It is awful, as you do not install a car, you install the car audio. Or "Human beings and behavior". Or "Star Trek and episodes". Well, you get the idea. The and implies that it connects two things on the same level, while it quite clearly does not. I will refrain from using strong language here, but it is sloppy to say the least. – RegDwigнt Jul 25 '13 at 13:25
  • @RegDwighт I see your point, but where “car installation” doesn't make sense, “English usage” is an established phrase already used on its own in similar contexts (see Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage), and not simply a modifier of English language. – Bradd Szonye Jul 25 '13 at 17:39
  • It occurs to me that my comment would make a decent answer. Posted. – Bradd Szonye Jul 25 '13 at 17:51
2

The existing title is just fine! its is understood here.

  • @Shaona.. hey I am not talking about this title when I want to write this somewhere then my english is right or not? that is only I want to know..:) – Java D Jul 18 '13 at 4:51
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    @JavaD When writing about the studying or learning of English, the expression: "English language and usage" is appropriate. – Mari-Lou A Jul 21 '13 at 5:43
  • this answer is demonstrably untrue. look at the first comment under the question: @BraddSzonye thinks it parses as "English Language and English Usage." – dbliss Jun 6 '15 at 1:51
2

English language and English usage are both common phrases related to the tongue, as in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language and Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage. Therefore, language and usage is simply a compound modifier indicating that the site emphasizes both aspects of English: not only its structure, meaning, and history (language), but also how to read and write it fluently (usage).

  • Thanks, this saved me a probably downvoted question asking why it’s “& usage” and if “English” doesn’t encompass its usage. – dakab Jun 23 '16 at 8:54

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