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Recently, I asked a question about the phrase "are you dumb bruv", it has been deleted

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/144708/are-you-dumb-bruv

When I try to undelete it, a message comes up saying "A moderator has deleted this post and it cannot be undeleted"

Apart from asking it again, what can I do to have it undeleted?

I noticed from the comments made against it, that it was not received very well by those that commented, but I do believe that it is answerable and also that the answer would be of interest to other people who want to know about the history and origins of this phrase.

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The question has been deleted automatically because it was closed for longer than a week with less than zero score and no editing activity. If you plan to edit the question, I can undelete it for you.

And to answer the more general question, you can post a question on Meta to ask to have a question undeleted. I believe high rep users can vote to undelete even questions that have been auto-deleted, and a Meta question is the correct way of politely asking for a review.

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It wasn't deleted by a human moderator; it was deleted by the Community♦ account. That deletes negatively-voted questions without an answer ten days [? a week? some time, anyway] after the last activity. Because it wasn't deleted by an actual corporeal moderator, it appears it can be undeleted by community votes.

Since the question was closed as "Unclear what you are asking," and nothing had been done to make that clearer, and the question had a negative score, deleting it seems to do everyone a favour, and I'm not convinced there's much to be gained by undeleting it.

I don't believe there is any merit in asking what "Are you dumb, bruv" means. A dictionary will tell you what dumb and bruv mean. There may be some merit in asking when or how it first arose, but such a short phrase in local slang is not going to be at all easy to trace.

Perhaps you could indicate in the question above how you propose to improve it?

  • I think that I chose the wrong words, when asking what it means, I was really trying ask in what situations it is used and from there to get an understanding of how it came about. "can't see the wood for the trees" I know what those words mean, both literally and figuratively. "are you dumb bruv" I know what those words mean literally, and I have an idea of what they mean figuratively, but if you see what I mean, finding invormation about "can't see the wood for the trees" is much easier than finding information about "are you dumb bruv" – user57234 Feb 28 '14 at 18:54
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    "Can't see the forest for the trees" in no way means "are you dumb". – Oldcat Feb 28 '14 at 19:24
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    RE: "I think that I chose the wrong words, when asking what it means, I was really trying ask in what situations it is used and from there to get an understanding of how it came about." Yup, it's a good idea to be careful how you ask. We can't read your mind and answer what you meant to ask :^) – J.R. Mar 1 '14 at 19:27
  • @Oldcat you are correct. at this point I feel it necessary to state that I have not claimed that "Can't see the forest for the trees" and "are you dumb" are in some way equal to each other. – user57234 Mar 1 '14 at 19:47
  • @J.R. I wouldn't say that it's a matter of mind reading, but more a matter of misunderstanding, I asked what I meant to ask, but it was misinterpreted. if i had asked it in a different way then that could have been avoided. – user57234 Mar 1 '14 at 19:52
  • @Alex - My apologies if my remark seemed gruff. I didn't mean for it to be. I will say, though, that I've seen many folks ask a brief question with scant details and it eventually gets misinterpreted, so I don't mind a chance to exhort folks to pose questions carefully. – J.R. Mar 1 '14 at 23:34

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