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The notion of a "well-received" question is mentioned in several places on EL&U – such as in the qualifications for the "Curious", "Inquisitive", and "Socratic" Question Badges – but I've been unable to find the specific criteria by which a question is adjudged to be "well-received". (I searched both Meta.English and the Help Center.) What are those criteria?

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I looked it up on meta:

"A well-received question is one that's open, not deleted, and has a score > 0."(

From meta.stackexchange.com/questions/234259/asking-days-badges

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    I guess that means this question is not "well-received" (having no upvotes as I write). – FumbleFingers Feb 9 '15 at 21:52
  • @FumbleFingers: Well, feel free to add one! =) – jdmc Feb 10 '15 at 17:38
  • @jdmc: Out of pure devilment (and to make my earlier comment still reasonably credible! :) I've just added my downvote (to one existing downvote masked by two upvotes). Actually, I can justify saying it's not a very useful question. The usage only arises in the context of an SE meta.meta proposal to award badges to people who ask "good" questions. But the proposal obviously ain't gonna fly, so the proposed definition isn't really relevant to anything. – FumbleFingers Feb 10 '15 at 18:10
  • @FumbleFingers: Forgive me, I'm a bit confused. The question arose for me when I viewed the list of available Question Badges here at EL&U, and those three (Curious, Inquisitive, Socratic) are right there—not just proposed, but implemented. Doesn't that make the definition of "well-received" relevant? – jdmc Feb 10 '15 at 18:43
  • You're right - I didn't look very far last time around. I see now the usage does exist and have a clearly-defined meaning for current contexts. So I've reversed my downvote (which as I said, was mainly for "not-very-justifiable" reasons anyway! :) – FumbleFingers Feb 10 '15 at 20:19

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