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I asked this question:

I _____ a work of fiction. (Fill in the blank.)

By "work of fiction", I meant "fictional story", or "fictional narrative", or "product of imagination that relates a series of connected imaginary events" -- you get the picture.

Most people answering and commenting on the question thought I meant "work of fictional literature". Consequently, the page is cluttered with discussion about the meaning of "fiction" rather than discussion of the word I am looking for.

How should I solve this problem? Ideas:

  • Add text to the question body to clarify what I mean by the question title. (I have done that, but the page is still cluttered, and the question title still misrepresents the intended question.)
  • Reword the question title. (The page would still be cluttered, and it would be even more confusing for someone who comes along later and sees all this irrelevant discussion about what a "work of fiction" is.)
  • Ask a new question.

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You should edit your question (and possibly the title) to explain what your personal definition of 'a work of fiction' is. Otherwise, readers will use the normal definition, of a written work (which may of course include a screenplay or anything similar).

One word of warning, though; if (as I suspect) you mean "anything, in any medium or using any sense, that is not documenting facts", the question is likely to be closed as 'too broad'. You would need to explain why you think all such experiences can be described by a single word.

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    I too suspect the real question being asked by OP is "too broad", but it really needs to be much more clearly expressed. For example, would OP include smelling "lab-created" chemicals that fictitiously give the impression they contain extracts from certain aromatic plants (but actually are only similar to the real thing in terms of how they affect our senses)? – FumbleFingers Aug 2 '15 at 16:23

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