-2

At this question: Usage of "do not " vs "does not", I saw the following in a comment:

As Reg Dwight has said, '[W]e write stuff in comments that is too obvious to qualify for an answer. [This] is not really a topic for a site for linguists and etymologists, and we don't want it to become a topic.'

Is this just something that those in the know have gradually figured out, or is it articulated formally somewhere?

-- Edit -- Or something else (if so, please politely explain). I feel like I've come into the movie theater in the middle of the movie. Please, help me understand what's going on in this site and what is expected of me.

  • 1
    Those are hardly the only two choices available. – tchrist Aug 24 '15 at 1:00
  • Here's some older discussion. As for formal or official policies, it seems to me Stack Exchange has a relative lack of them. I think you should use your own judgement, but listen to what people have to say. Thank you for asking this question on Meta; that can often be a good way to get some input. meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/2653/… – herisson Aug 24 '15 at 3:26
  • 3
    By the way, the closest thing to formal policies that I know of are the documentation in the Help Center, and the mechanics of the site itself. To learn more about how the mechanics work, you can look at the general Meta Stack Exchange. – herisson Aug 24 '15 at 3:27
2

Please, help me understand what's going on in this site and what is expected of me.

The "search" function in meta can be very, very helpful. For example, searching "answers in comments" will get you 676 results, of which the top few should provide a lot of insight.

These may answer your query:

Etc.

Although the last two are closed as duplicates, the answers in the comments (ha) are very helpful.

Given that you have posted a number of questions about the site, I suggest that a giving a reason why your search of meta has not cleared your confusion about an issue will help you get a more helpful and satisfying answer.

Also, fyi: SE etiquette is that meta questions are about an issue, not a user, so names are usually left out of questions on meta to avoid making it about a particular user. :-)

  • Is there really such a policy as "names are usually left out of questions on meta to avoid making it about a particular user"? – Pacerier Sep 27 '15 at 13:48
  • @Pacerier - yes, that is the usual. Is it written anywhere? I don't think so. Have questions been edited to remove names? Absolutely. – anongoodnurse Sep 27 '15 at 15:10

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .