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Sorry to make a post about "why my question was closed," but I'm having a hard time understanding it.

The question about "uroboros" asks about two things: descriptive information about the history of that particular word's various pronunciations, and prescriptive advice about the validity of one hypothetical pronunciation that I give.

The question about "stigmata" asks for descriptive information about the history of that particular word's various pronunciations. The one answer that exists so far gives an explanation in terms of inflectional endings, which is completely inapplicable to the case of "uroboros." So "This question already has an answer here" seems to be false.

In theory, if they're duplicates, I should be able to edit the question about "stigmata" to make it about both "stigmata" and "uroboros". In fact, though, that would be a different question, and it would invalidate the current answer. So I can't do this in practice.

I don't see how the first can be a duplicate of the second: the pronunciation history of one word is not identical to that of another. So far, no answer has been posted that provides a general explanation.


I know that two people voted to close the question

because it is better suited for SE linguistics.

But, this doesn't explain how my question is off-topic for this particular site.

In any case, I just decided to re-post on Linguistics. But I'd like to know if similar questions about other words would be welcomed here in the future, or if they would be inappropriate or considered to all be duplicates of each other.

  • You asked for a pattern, implying linguistics. But pronunciation as a usage question is also interesting and clearly appropriate. As someone who learned a little Greek and also reads, I have questions like yours all the time. I usually wonder "how would or does a speaker (of English) naturalize this word" and "how would an (Oxford) academic pronounce it" respectively "(hip New World) academic". – som-snytt Oct 8 '15 at 17:16
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    If there was any logic in the world, a question about uroboros would be closed as a duplicate of itself. – Andrew Grimm Oct 15 '15 at 12:01
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    @Andrew: Well, if you've got your mouth full, the pronunciation is moot anyway. – John Lawler Oct 15 '15 at 15:49

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