13 votes

I'm new here, does this site favour or favor questions of this English Language? (USA vs UK)

All dialects of English are on topic and welcome. Just make sure you give sources for your definitions when they come from dictionaries and cultural and geographical background if your answer is based ...
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  • 20.7k
12 votes

Should we discourage the use of argot such as AmE, BrE, ELU, ...?

ELU is for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts -- in other words, specialists. Specialists have their own jargon, and they use it routinely to communicate clearly and ...
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  • 27.7k
7 votes

Should we discourage the use of argot such as AmE, BrE, ELU, ...?

(Don't know what this adds to @MetaEd's excellent answer, but here goes.) I really don't think this is a problem (at least it's never been raised in meta before.) Some background might help to ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Dictionary that provides all correct usages of words

Short answer: No, there's no perfectly correct dictionary, but the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) will probably get you what you want. Longer answer: There are a number of issues you bring up. '...
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  • 68.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Good resources for collocations

Does this link help at all? I just downloaded it and it's working well. Free download Oxford collocations Dictionary
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1 vote

Good resources for collocations

Some more references: OED online At the end of an entry are usually pairs of words starting with the target word. You get free access to the OED online if you have a public library card number in ...
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  • 68.7k
1 vote

Tomayto, tomahto -- How can we avoid barriers to understanding on SE ELU?

With English as a language there are the basics which are relatively common, but there are a lot of words and phrases that are localised slang or colloquialisms. If I am talking to someone (...
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  • 191

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