29

You seem awfully certain that people are asking for these words because they want to use them to hurt others. There are many different reasons why someone might want to learn a particular pejorative word, some negative and some quite positive. You yourself used a lot of negative words when writing this question—disgust, bile, nasty, violence, etc.—and nobody ...


23

While I understand people may feel icky or annoyed that our language has mean things in it, I don't feel that it is our job to tell people where the line between "not that mean" and "too mean" is. We can offer our opinion while answering, certainly, but I don't see a convincing argument that it is any of our business to start making rules based on grey moral ...


7

Personal opinion here, but I think tagging 233 posts (latest count) Pejorative language is self-defeating your noble argument that we dissuade users from seeking expressions which are used to attack, demean, and disrespect one another. I don’t think it is a healthy thing for the questioner, nor good for our site or the larger social context, for us to ...


7

We allow questions about profanity, which are hurtful to some. I feel like an argument against hurtful terms or pejoratives would work for profanity, too. So I propose that there's nothing mechanical to do in general against these kinds of requests, but to allow disinterested engagement with the intellectual problem posed by them (epithets, profanity) ...


7

I believe @tchrist has a valid point. As a community, we espouse respect and courtesy in all members. These requests have the effect of a drive by maiming. Not only are they ugly and unkind (and unlikely to be posed by people interested in becoming productive members of the site), but they attract unwanted attention and entice others to repeat the behavior ...


6

From your quote: "Pejorative language is any language that portrays someone or something in a negative light, no matter whether it is intended to be disparaging and derogatory, contemptuous or disapproving, belittling or offensive, or even abusive. It’s anything that makes someone or something look bad." Unless I miss my guess and "assholes" has a positive ...


6

I’m coming at this as someone whose question was just tagged pejorative language (I’ve already got a good answer, so I don’t really care). I can understand why someone could see my question as looking for an insulting term, but I was looking for a term to refer to a class of people which at some point or other includes nearly everyone who posts on forums, ...


4

I don't know what you're goal is here. You tagged Word meant to describe a crime where women beat men with your pejorative language tag. Why would you feel such questions are mean-spirited? There are a lot of bad things that happen in the world, and our language has words to describe people and their behaviors. If I were to ask 'what do you someone who....?...


1

Given the number of people who won't recognise or adhere to the difference in spelling between a grammatical category complement and the more common "well-wishing" sense of compliment, I've got to say it seems like a terrible idea to actually call the tag that. I don't really see any point in grouping together requests that ask for an "approving, supportive"...


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