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Is the preferred pronoun, or whatever its correct name is, confined to singular they, or are there some new pronouns that people are insisting on? No, it's not confined to singular they. Yes there are new pronouns. From the Official FAQ on gender pronouns and Code of Conduct changes: Q9: Do I have to use pronouns I’m unfamiliar or uncomfortable with (...


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Sometimes people use they online to obscure their gender for safety or social reasons where they might use a gendered pronoun in real life. I don't think I have much to add, but it seemed like this was a completely separate point in the discussion, so I made a separate answer for it.


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If the tour's example question about "nosebleed seats" had never existed and were posted as a new question today, I would expect English Language & Usage site participants to close it within a day. First, where is the research? "I've never heard of this idiom before today" doesn't qualify under even the most minimal interpretation of this requirement. ...


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The Code of Conduct did not specifically state a preference for using pronouns when a user's pronouns are unknown. I personally use singular they for this purpose. Others might use a different pronoun, and that's ok, when the user's pronouns are not known. In that sense, there is no "preferred pronoun". However, when the user's pronouns are known (...


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For those interested in delving deeper; Monica Cellio's dismissal as moderator on six sites, including Meta, stems from the updated CoC (Code of Conduct) which Stack Exchange plans to release this coming Thursday. This has led to flurry of resignations (16) and a formal moderators' letter as well as numerous posts on Meta. Currently, there are three ...


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A preferred pronoun is basically anything a person might prefer to be referred to in place of the normally assigned third person pronouns, and the only way to know somebody's preferred pronouns is to be informed on a per-individual basis. Transgender 101: A Simple Guide to a Complex Issue by Nicholas M Teich Pronouns can be a bit more complicated than ...


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No. Two moderators lost their diamonds (MetaEd and Waiwai933) because they have not been active (in moderator terms) for more than 6 months. This is the standard practice, and is completely unrelated to the turmoil elsewhere. I think I can safely say, the EL&U mod team was sad to see the diamonds go, but we understand that SE need to enforce the rules. ...


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It looks like MetaEd is no longer on the list (which was news to me until just now), but I haven't seen any indication that the absence is related to the recent controversy. While I don't think this particular absence is anything to be worried about specifically, I'm honestly surprised there's been no meta discussion here of the changes and proposed ...


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It is our policy that when a user account is suspended, any accounts that are created to circumvent that suspension are deleted without notice. If you have further questions or if you want to appeal the decision, you can contact SE staff: english.stackexchange.com/contact


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Given the context, I believe what you mean by "report" is whether a flag has been raised on a post or comment that you wrote. The answer is no. If I have misunderstood what you are asking, please edit your question to clarify.


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From the information I've garnered so far on the Meta Page, there is no required feedback nor defined structure in which a moderator can act. There are processes that are put into place to review decisions, but from what I've seen so far it's essentially a pointless endeavour. A post such as this is the best you can hope for, but if you hope to find out ...


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Yes they can. A one-rep user can flag the following: I am flagging to report this question as... should be closed... This question is completely unclear, incomplete, overly-broad, primarily opinion-based or is not about English language and usage as described in the help center, and it is unlikely to be fixed via editing. a duplicate... ...


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Reception and commentary No. The existence of comments on a question do not indicate one way or another that a question is well received. Neither does the absence of comments. It’s possible and observed that well-received questions can have comments or no comments. Equally, it’s possible and observed that poorly-received questions can have comments or no ...


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I fear there is nothing that can be done. I hope I'm mistaken, but once an account has been deleted that's it. If a moderator deleted an account by mistake then there is a glimmer of hope… No, this is not possible. Once a profile is deleted, it is gone forever. We can restore past content to a new profile, but we only do so for users who were deleted ...


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Please do not simply ask the same question again. It's already been judged as off-topic and better suited to a different site (where comments indicate it's been reasonably well-received). If you specifically want to ask about the English language, that could be on-topic here; but I would suggest that you wait until you have a general answer upon which to ...


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This is more of a comment, but I can't comment at this stage. I've come to learn this in my short time on this page, but most decisions are personal preference based rather than an adherence to a set of established community rules. For instance, a user doesn't need to provide any reason for up/down voting (as an example). When it comes to closing a post, ...


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Grammar = Morphology + Syntax Grammar refers to either of these two things: How to fit together elements of meaning smaller than a single word. How to fit together elements of meaning larger than a single word. The sub-lexical constituent components referred to by the first category are the language’s morphemes, and so this part of a language’s grammar we ...


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As it happens, that question has never received any answers whatsoever, for there are zero deleted answers on the question Seeking clarification on the use of “They/Them/Their” as a personal gender pronoun. Why it should be axiomatically impossible to discover why something that never happened happened I shall have no choice but to leave as a possible ...


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Neither up- nor downvotes require a reason, and this, together with the anonymity of voting, is an important part of the Stack Exchange model. You can find a good number of discussions around this if you look, but there is no point arguing about it. Partly this is beacause nobody on the site has the power to change it, and partly because argument is itself ...


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According to a Wikipedia comparison of English dictionaries, the Oxford Dictionary of English has the highest number of entries (355,00). Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_English_dictionaries However, if you are an English-language learner then I would suggest that the best dictionary for you is not the one that is 'the most complete and ...


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Heavily downvoted bad answers should be preserved as feedback for visitors, not deleted. They demonstrate the sorts of answers that are not welcomed by the community, and may prevent such answers in the future. In this specific case, deletion of the answer may lead someone to believe the “soggy biscuit” thing has not been brought up before and cause them ...


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Moderators can refund your bounty. Flag for moderator attention and explain the situation. This is something mods only do in rare cases, but one accidental bounty on the wrong question in a period of years seems like a reasonable ask to me.


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I have posted an answer. In the meantime, the accepted answer, which is absolute hogwash, continues to attract a few distracted upvotes. Evan Carroll, the OP, posted the following comment. He clearly enjoys being a provocateur... In fairness, it could be a reaction to an earlier comment


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@Mari-Lou A wrote: Several links in my posts have been fixed by this user, and I've always given the green light. Fixing a corrupt link is nearly always a good thing, regardless of the post or author's status. I don't think the edits have got out of hand. @Sven wrote: Edits are supposed to make a post significantly better, and correcting a bad link is ...


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As a first approximation, you can try looking up word frequency lists online. If you want more curated results, try https://www.english-corpora.org/coca/, where you can query one word followed by the other, and see how many results those searches bring up. This service is limited in the number of searches you can make (maybe 20 per day or month) unless you ...


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The way I read it is that Evan is giving us the benefit of the doubt. His question reads: Why do people in the UK hate biscuits, and how did the saying "take the biscuit" come to be? So despite the allusion to how we Brits are "irrational", he assumes we are "rational" in asking why we hate biscuits, because it's only rational to hate biscuits if taking ...


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Regarding the titular question, the code of conduct forbids "subtle putdowns", "unfriendly language", "Name calling", "personal attacks" (which "includes terms that feel personal even when they're applied to content [e.g. 'lazy']") and "harassment", so generally speaking, the answer is going to be yes, that scolding a user is a flaggable offense, and the ...


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This isn't really the best question in the world. A major point against it is that it opens up based on a false premise that wong can be used as a legitimate alternative to wrong. However, it would probably be more appropriate to fix this through a comment recommending the removal of extraneous information, or pontificating upon the point in an answer ...


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When someone asks a question it's imperative that they provide their own research. Only they know what they've read, what they haven't. Only they know what options they've tried and found inadequate. You added in research the OP never indicated they read. How does that help anyone? Why didn't you add in the research you posted in your answer? Because then ...


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