11 votes
Accepted

Would this question have been off-topic here?

I think NVZ is right: it may very well have been closed on EL&U, sadly. This site is very close happy about questions that are very interesting but that is not exclusively about modern English (...
10 votes

Would this question have been off-topic here?

Since both words are (now) part of the English language, I think that asking about their etymology would be on-topic at this site. Also, the question you posted at Linguistics SE shows research effort ...
  • 153k
9 votes

How can I improve my contributions

It's utterly pointless to complain about comments being deleted. It's perhaps even more pointless to be upset by some being deleted while others remain. That just leads to wasted emotion. Comments ...
8 votes
Accepted

Is there an online etymology dictionary more comprehensive/detailed than Etymonline?

Oxford (OED) is the most complete source I've seen online. It's subscription-only though, unless you are on campus at a university or something. It goes a little deeper than Etymonline, in that you ...
6 votes

How can I improve my contributions

I won't repeat what Jason has written (but I did upvote it). Your comment did not really touch upon the question: In German these would translate as Hals, (Gebärmutterhals, also Flaschenhals "...
  • 96k
5 votes

I want to study the various usages of the 17th and 16th century verb "atone". Other than oed.com, where can I study this verb and adverb?

For primary source research, Early English Books Online is an excellent resource for searching among a corpus of printed texts from the period. There are two free ways to access this: the EEBO Text ...
3 votes

Why are etymology questions that show research getting/staying closed?

TL;DR Etymology questions are no different from any other on-topic question. If they show no effort and no research, they should be placed on hold until the OP, or someone else, fixes/improves their ...
  • 86.3k
3 votes

Is there a site that you can search for words of the same root/origin of the word you enter?

Yes. Dictionary.com gives all words from the root -- as well as nearby words / related searches. It also has a History and Origin section for entries. For more information on other related resources ...
2 votes
Accepted

Best book for vocabulary building through etymology

Norman Lewis: Word Power Made Easy is one of the best books. Good reads review
1 vote

For any word, see constituent roots; for any root, see composite words

Yes, the Oxford English Dictionary web application provides this service. If you look up the word composite in the OED, it reveals that its etymology is: Etymology: < Latin compositus, past ...
  • 129k
1 vote

Why are etymology questions that show research getting/staying closed?

Here are some thoughts I have on the matter: The probable reason One thing that needs to be considered is that it takes time for things to be processed through the review queue, and even if a ...
  • 4,511
1 vote

List of words with the dates they first appear in English?

You seem to want a(n electronic) list of words with date of first appearance, in order to write a script that will tell you which words are in or out of style for a given date. First, I don't think ...
  • 69.3k
1 vote

List of words with the dates they first appear in English?

Lexicographers are not omniscient. Dictionaries and other research publications provide not dates of first use or dates of earliest use but dates of earliest-known use, which may change if research ...

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