11

I think NVZ is right: it may very well have been closed on EL&U, sadly. This site is very close happy about questions that are very interesting but that is not exclusively about modern English (and also about other types of questions). I would certainly support your question, though. The cause of this that it takes the votes of only 5 high-rep users to ...


10

Since both words are (now) part of the English language, I think that asking about their etymology would be on-topic at this site. Also, the question you posted at Linguistics SE shows research effort on your part, so the question would clearly have passed muster on that account. Just by way of underscoring that no easily accessible answer to your question ...


9

It's utterly pointless to complain about comments being deleted. It's perhaps even more pointless to be upset by some being deleted while others remain. That just leads to wasted emotion. Comments are ephemeral. They are not meant to be permanent. Don't ever assume that any of them will continue to exist at any given moment. If you want to say something ...


9

English proper names follow most of the same rules and customs as other English words, and they're subject to the same evolutionary forces. They’re clearly different from names in other languages: John Paul II is distinctly English whereas Ioannes Paulus II and Jan Paweł II are not. They follow English rules for inflection and combination, such that we can ...


8

Oxford (OED) is the most complete source I've seen online. It's subscription-only though, unless you are on campus at a university or something. It goes a little deeper than Etymonline, in that you can see cited examples of the earliest uses of a word. Harper's site is perfectly good for most uses, though. If you just want to learn the origins, even ...


6

I won't repeat what Jason has written (but I did upvote it). Your comment did not really touch upon the question: In German these would translate as Hals, (Gebärmutterhals, also Flaschenhals "bottleneck"), whereas Nacken exclusively describes the back of the neck, as in Red-Neck. Hals in that sense is understood as a kind of tube, i.e. throat; cp im ...


5

For primary source research, Early English Books Online is an excellent resource for searching among a corpus of printed texts from the period. There are two free ways to access this: the EEBO Text Creation Partnership, which has basic search tools across the whole corpus of texts, and the more selective EEBO corpus on the English Corpora site that has been ...


3

TL;DR Etymology questions are no different from any other on-topic question. If they show no effort and no research, they should be placed on hold until the OP, or someone else, fixes/improves their post. Etymology questions that show research and are not duplicates, should not be closed except in those instances when the answer can be easily googled (see ...


3

Yes. Questions about the origin of people's names are on topic, if the name is considered an English name. By English name I don't name that it originated in England, I mean that it is a name of someone whose native language is English. Once that is the case it becomes part of the English language, and so fair game to ask where it came from at EL&U. ...


3

Proper names are words in the English language. Proper names can be anything at all and don't have follow any of the conventions of the English language. There is going to be a fuzzy line where some things are "interesting" and "on-topic" where others will not be but I don't think proper names are very relevant to understanding how the English language ...


3

I agree with 2 and 3, but disagree with #1, so #4 doesn't work out for me. Proper names aren't particular to English. My surname could be English, but could just as easily be Irish or German or a corruption of some original Norwegian name. Maybe you could skate by with something like "Why are English names usually given name followed by family name?" but ...


3

Yes. Dictionary.com gives all words from the root -- as well as nearby words / related searches. It also has a History and Origin section for entries. For more information on other related resources online see the comprehensive meta thread here: What good reference works on English are available?


2

Norman Lewis: Word Power Made Easy is one of the best books. Good reads review


1

Yes, the Oxford English Dictionary web application provides this service. If you look up the word composite in the OED, it reveals that its etymology is: Etymology: < Latin compositus, past participle of compōnĕre to put together. Compare French composite (in Archit.). Introduced first in the architectural sense (2), the only one recognized by ...


1

Here are some thoughts I have on the matter: The probable reason One thing that needs to be considered is that it takes time for things to be processed through the review queue, and even if a question is rendered acceptable by community standards, there is no guarantee that it will get enough exposure. That the questions were reopened here at meta suggests ...


1

You seem to want a(n electronic) list of words with date of first appearance, in order to write a script that will tell you which words are in or out of style for a given date. First, I don't think there is a good list out there. One could presumably extract such information from the OED, which has the most reliable 'first appearance' dates on each entry. ...


1

Lexicographers are not omniscient. Dictionaries and other research publications provide not dates of first use or dates of earliest use but dates of earliest-known use, which may change if research uncovers even earlier uses. This publication is available free of charge online: Gold, David L. 2005. "An Aspect of Lexicography Still Not Fully ...


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