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Grammar McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English. It turns out that the first three chapters of this classic 1998 grammar are available free on Google Books. The rest of the book is not. This seems to be very good marketing for University of Chicago Press, or whoever made this decision, because it gives a good and useful sample of what's in the book. ...


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In this post, the ELU moderators attempt to consolidate all the advice in order that: it’s relevant for the English Language & Usage Stack Exchange site; it’s all in one place; it’s easily assimilated; and it provides a starting-point for future moderators as well. Because this site actually discusses language, there are some quirks and edge cases ...


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Historical Resources These are books of possible interest to people who are investigating word and phrase origins and want to know what meanings those words or phrase were said to have at various times in the past. Several of them do not show up in a direct Google Books search for them by title; I've run into the hidden ones by chance, while searching for a ...


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What is the best use of chat vs when should you post or comment? A rule of thumb (which I just made up) is, if what you have to say is oriented toward the site -- for example, you're pointing out a logical or factual error in a post, or asking for clarification -- then it should stay on the site, i.e. as a comment. If what you have to say is oriented toward ...


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Having spent a bit of time on this, I'm going to post it anyway, although KitFox just beat me to it! No; the "new attribution rules" apply specifically to quoted material. A simple link to further reading does not require attribution, but where there is material reproduced from elsewhere it is not sufficient merely to provide a link. A comment has ...


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Okay, I guess I should have added my answers here instead of above in the comments. So, I'll try again. Dictionary.com gives all the source references on one page, from English and slang to science, computing, and medical dictionaries, including History and Origin, all from specific dictionaries. It includes nearby words, related searches, and all words ...


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There's a post on main Meta about this, from Community Manager bluefeet. I've copied it pretty much verbatim below, as it seems to answer your questions about what a room owner can/can't/should do. As for your last question about finding and identifying room owners, they're listed on the info page for a given chatroom. E.g. for the main ELU chatroom: copy ...


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You're right to want to come to chat. It's a wonderful place where lots of great and constructive discussion happens. To find your way to chat you'll have to look at the top of the site, to the left of where your avatar is: There you'll see the Stack Exchange logo. Click on that and a menu will appear. I have highlighted there the link to chat. Click on ...


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Lexipedia: For the word you search, it has: Nouns Adverbs Verbs Adjectives Synonyms Antonyms Fuzzynyms


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In the example presented by Claudiu—"Does the word cheese indicate something yellow?" I would follow the Chicago Manual of Style convention of italicizing words used as words: Does the word cheese indicate something yellow? I would do so not because this particular option is inherently superior to other ways of calling out a word used as word, but ...


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Stack Exchange questions and answers are written by you, the members of the Stack Exchange community. Your work is valuable to the community, and you get credit in the form of reputation for the value that you create. Like many institutions, such as schools, journals, and news organizations, Stack Exchange does not permit you to improve your reputation using ...


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YourDictionary.com also has example sentences using specific words Crossword helpers: One Across OjoHaven's Crossword Solver


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My usage, as I put it in a post some time ago, In this medium, where writing and typography has to express speech and sounds, I use italics and boldface like this: I use plain italics only for citing examples and titles. Never for emphasis. I use boldface for emphasis. These are words that would be LOUD in my speech. I use bold italics for technical terms, ...


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Editing Messages As you note in your question, it is possible to edit your messages, within a 2 minute window of posting them. There are two method's for editing. The easiest is to push the up arrow key ↑, and that will put your last message in the text box for creating messages. You'll notice that the background of the text box is darker now that ...


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You Could Look It Up by StoneyB 2012-12-17, filed under English Stack Exchange Your question has been “Closed as General Reference”. That raises more questions: What does that mean? Why was it closed? What should you do about it? What Does It Mean? First, what it doesn’t mean. It doesn’t mean “Your question is worthless. Don’t bother us.” It certainly doesn’...


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Grammar Girl Interview 2011-10-19 by Mr. Shiny & New, filed under English Stack Exchange As someone who is interested in the English language and word history, I don’t just participate in English Language & Usage, I also read other blogs. Grammar Girl, from Quick and Dirty Tips, is a good blog to read for English advice. She recently agreed to do ...


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How we talk about future situations by tunny 2015-09-07, filed under Grammar, Learning People learning English are often confused by the many ways in which it is possible to talk about future events. They are not helped by the fact that some writers (eg, Sinclair {1}) claim that the construction with will in front of the base form (bare infinitive) of the ...


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Good English = Effective English by Barrie England 2012-12-03, filed under Linguistics Speech and the written language differ in many ways. Speech developed before writing and we learn to speak before we learn to write. For a long time there was no written language at all, and there are languages that have no written form. That is not to say we can say what ...


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Chat vs Comment by Matt Ellen 2013-07-11, filed under English Stack Exchange Hello my friend! How are you doing? It is good to see you around these parts, the Stack Exchange network is a lovely part of the Internet where we can all help each other to learn. Of course, though, there are rules by which we should abide if we want to keep this place friendly ...


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I have a few quibbles with this answer. Is this effort even necessary? Has there been some increase in plagiarism lately on ELU? Or some particularly egregious cases? Anything that requires explication of the general policy? This one is merely an issue of style. File it in the category of How to get over ourselves. Can we drop the references in the ...


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Why did I delete your answer? by Matt Ellen 2015-11-13, filed under English Stack Exchange, Learning Imagine someone has a question about physics, say “How can I figure out the acceleration due to gravity?” A physicist answers with “You can throw a bowling ball from various floors of a multistorey building.” The physicist knows in their head the ...


2

I don't really think code is a good alternative for adding emphasis. Code is for code, not visually highlighting something. According to me, italics serve the purpose. They're called emphasis (<em>) in Web development too, so here you have it.


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That vs Which: A Pragmatic Approach 2012-10-01 by StoneyB. 6 comments Filed under Grammar “There’s glory for you!” H. Dumpty, founder of linguistic pragmatics If you’re looking for a balanced discussion of the That vs Who/whom/whose/which controversy, go here. I’m not interested. A hundred years ago the Fowlers put forward a modest proposal. ...


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How to Ask out an Apple 2011-09-20 by Matt Ellen. 3 comments Filed under Grammar Tagged: learning, verb, verb-tense Hello there Paul! I understand you’re staying in England to learn the language. That should be “I am here to learn English.” I think you mean “Please explain to me.” Well, you were explaining your reason for coming to the UK. In English,...


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Articles: “A” vs. “An” 2011-11-04 by waiwai933. 5 comments Filed under Grammar Tagged: articles, pronunciation One of the prevalent questions on the English Language and Usage – Stack Exchange is about whether a or an is the correct indefinite article to use. It’s a straightforward question, but like all questions, there are subtleties that raise ...


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Book Review – The Adventure of English 2012-01-11 by Matt Ellen. 3 comments Filed under Etymology Tagged: Book review, etymology, history The Adventure of English The Biography of a Language by Melvyn Bragg While I am a serious enthusiast when it comes to learning about and understanding my native tongue, I am an amateur with regards to my studies. ...


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Prescriptivism and Descriptivism 2012-10-15 by Cameron. 13 comments Filed under Linguistics Imagine you are reading something on the Internet (I know, it’s a stretch), and you come across the following passage: I want to be sure that you and me are on the same page. When you ask how I feel about grammar, you are begging the question, “Are you a ...


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Looking Up a Gun: Common English Words with Nordic Origins 2012-11-05 by Luke. 2 comments Filed under Etymology Tagged: etymology , history Old Norse words in the English language are much more numerous than many would suspect. Many common words such as gun , craze , and equip are of Nordic origin. Because the two languages were so similar, they have ...


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Much Ado About Possessive Apostrophes 2012-11-19 by kitfox. 9 comments Filed under Orthography Tagged:possessive-apostrophe Apostrophes are lovely little critters, but they tend to boggle the mind if you think about them too much.  One of the most common questions on EL&U regards proper usage of an apostrophe to indicate possession. The basics. How ...


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