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Dictionaries Useful for finding definitions, etymologies, pronunciations, and examples of usage. General-purpose dictionaries The online dictionaries listed here are broadly suitable for native speakers, providing major definitions and examples, pronunciations (including audio), basic etymology, and some usage notes. Some are among the most commonly cited ...


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Corpora Large collections of original source text. The online tools that are available for searching corpora, however, may be overkill for the average user, and may be confusing to use. English-Corpora.org - Formerly corpus.byu.edu, this is perhaps the most popular corpus search engine, created by Mark Davies at Brigham Young University. Key collections ...


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Thesauri Useful for finding synonyms of specific words. Merriam-Webster Thesaurus.com Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus (included with Mac OS X) Power Thesaurus WordNet


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Style The guidelines governing the presentation of written English are collectively referred to as style, and laid out in various rulebooks and manuals. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide a uniform presentation, to improve readability and as a mark of professionalism. Some industries, such as screenwriting, use specific formats, but any ...


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General Language and English Language Reference The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language, 2nd ed. 2003. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, 3rd ed. 2010. Both are written and edited by David Crystal. They should be in every Anglophone classroom in the world, and should be consulted first about questions bearing on English. All works by ...


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Your question was quite interesting! People liked it: it attracted 4 upvotes, along with a detailed, upvoted answer from a reputable user. You should definitely not feel any embarrassment or shame that it was closed¹; you didn't ask a bad question, you simply asked a question that we (as a community, and as a site with a specific set of aims) are not ...


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Grammar McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English. It turns out that the first three chapters of this classic 1998 grammar are available free on Google Books. The rest of the book is not. This seems to be very good marketing for University of Chicago Press, or whoever made this decision, because it gives a good and useful sample of what's in the book. ...


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My problem with the "General Reference" justification for closing questions is a bit different from the one raised here by phenry: Too often people vote to close a question on that basis without doing any research into the poster's question themselves. A case in point occurred yesterday. A poster with a reasonably strong track record at EL&U (1,710 ...


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Translation Dictionaries and Lexica Linguee - a search engine rather than an automatic translator, Linguee allows the user to find words and phrases in context in human-translated works, in addition to an editorial dictionary. bab.la - a language project by Andreas Schroeter and Patrick Uecker and sponsored by Langenscheidt providing 39 bilingual ...


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IMHO, it's valid to close a question as "general reference" when it is on the order of, "What is the definition of X?" or "How do you pronounce X?" or "What are some synonyms for X?" But questions about connotation and common usage seem to me to go beyond "general reference". For example, when I was in school we saw a documentary on factory robots that was ...


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As I've said before, general reference means that there is a type of reference source that is specifically designed to answer that type of question. The list is actually pretty limited: dictionary, thesaurus, and encyclopedia. Note, for example, that there isn't a standard place to look up "is this grammatical" types of questions, so even the simplest ...


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Historical Resources These are books of possible interest to people who are investigating word and phrase origins and want to know what meanings those words or phrase were said to have at various times in the past. Several of them do not show up in a direct Google Books search for them by title; I've run into the hidden ones by chance, while searching for a ...


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I didn't know there was a US/UK difference on this until the question came up and I looked into it. And so far as I'm concerned, I really did have to "look into it". My first minute on Google failed to turn up anything definitive (like OP, I saw nothing obvious in the link given by the first closevoter). First I had to establish the (to me as a Brit, ...


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A standard reference is a source (book, website, what have you) that is specifically designed to provide a certain type of information. So, if you're looking for a definition, a dictionary is a standard reference source; if you're looking for a synonym, a thesaurus should be your first destination; etc. So yes, Urban Dictionary is a reference source for ...


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Okay, I guess I should have added my answers here instead of above in the comments. So, I'll try again. Dictionary.com gives all the source references on one page, from English and slang to science, computing, and medical dictionaries, including History and Origin, all from specific dictionaries. It includes nearby words, related searches, and all words ...


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I quite understand OP's reason for linking to our recommended references page, but to be honest I'm not sure we could ever expect any such list to suit our General Reference context. For example, 1: OED is an excellent reference, but it's not available to most people at a price they can/will afford. 2: Onelook, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary, etc., are ...


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Yeah, someone should have simply answered the OP's question. It would most likely take only a minute or two. It would take less time to answer the question than to go around searching for an exact "duplicate"; also the OP wouldn't then have to pore over the "duplicate" thread(s) in an attempt to construct an answer to the original question. On EL&U, ...


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I'm adding this answer because kiamlaluno's It's quite too early to add any link to ELL is out-of-date. I think we should now have a line in the What kind of questions can I ask here? section of the ELU FAQ saying something along the lines of... Please consider whether your question might be better asked on English Language Learners.


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Dissection or Parse of Sentences Courtesy of https://english.stackexchange.com/a/233771/50720, I encountered the Link Parser.


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Lexipedia: For the word you search, it has: Nouns Adverbs Verbs Adjectives Synonyms Antonyms Fuzzynyms


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The OED is paywalled, but many people in the US and UK can get access to the OED for free through their local public libraries. This unfortunately leaves out quite a few people of the world. However it is a strong ELU guideline that if something like the OED is used or likewise any free on-line services, that both a quote and a link is given. I can't say ...


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The only one of these questions that I had anything to do with was Is it correct to use an apostrophe to indicate something that belongs to an object? I was very much in favor of keeping this question open when I first saw it (and answered it), and I voted to reopen it after editing the question to make it more EL&U-like. But after receiving the ...


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Worst idea ever. If we give them the link, we are completely defeating the whole point, we are just doing what they want and training them to be gimme-the-codez beggars. This has been raised many time before, and shot down every time for this very reason. Furthermore, it dramatically fails the litmus test of whether it improves the quality of the site for ...


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Perhaps what we need is an insufficient research close reason. We can and should downvote for a lack of evidence of research, but there's no legitimate close reason for that. Maybe there should be? @AndrewLeach wrote a great post earlier this year about showing research. Here are some quotes: The answer to "how much research is needed?" is "Enough to ...


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YourDictionary.com also has example sentences using specific words Crossword helpers: One Across OjoHaven's Crossword Solver


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If the best answer is googling for it and without any need for commentary giving a link, then it is not an appropriate answer for SE, and so should be closed as general reference. I think many basic questions about grammar and vocabulary are not answerable like that, and so I think they do not warrant a closure. If commentary is warranted, then it shouldn'...


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The question was posted on November 2nd 2010. GR got proposed more than two months later, and implemented several months later still (can't find the exact date right now). You are free to vote to close as GR now that that reason exists. Alternatively, or in addition, the question can get a historical-importance lock.


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The question, as asked, provided no context and no explanation for why the asker was asking, and we can thus only conclude that they are asking for the meaning of a phrase of the form "give someone X", which IMHO is definitely too basic to be asking here. The OP mentioned, in passing, having done a Google search, but I find it incredible that a search for "...


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Well, it actually has been answered here. We have many questions on bare conditionals with if-deletion and inversion. It would probably be better to re-open and re-close it as a duplicate of one of those. Conditional sentences not starting with “if” A special use of “should”? Inverted conditional sentence using 'can' and 'will' What is the meaning of this ...


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Googling, I could find many sites that contain a grammatically not correct sentence; that doesn't mean the sentence is correct because Google found more than one site using that sentence. If the first three links given from Google are to sites that can used as reference, that is different. Google generally returns links to resources that are available to ...


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