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Congratulations! You have hit the daily reputation cap (200, that is). You can earn a maximum of 200 reputation per day from any combination of the activities below. Bounty awards, accepted answers, and association bonuses are not subject to the daily reputation limit. Read more: What is reputation? How do I earn (and lose) it? Now you can get these badges:...


13

Yes, you need at least 250 reputation to see and cast close/reopen votes on your own questions and at least 3000 reputation to do so on any question. This is a screenshot I took of one of my questions on a site where I have less than 250 reputation: New users can still cause their own questions to be sent to the reopen queue by making a good edit to ...


13

This is the Association Bonus, which is given to all your associated accounts when you reach 200 points on one of them. You can get to your reputation changes from your user profile page: click on your username in the header bar, and then on Reputation in the line under the two panels, where Summary is highlighted on the left.


11

The two downvotes (so far) on the OP's submitted answer were probably from users who had not read the post carefully, they probably thought the first suggestion, peep show, was "bad", or "incorrect", or "inappropriate", or simply "wrong". The user's answer (now self-deleted) explains very clearly why the OP asking the question might prefer not to use ...


11

That's not quite how reputation works. Voting for other people's answers (and questions) gives those people reputation (except on meta). Also, nobody gets reputation from comments, even when they are upvoted. To make this more clear, I've quoted "What's Reputation", with some minor changes for clarification: Your reputation is increased when: [...


10

Help center explains a lot about comments, and is a must read. Comments are temporary "Post-It" notes left on a question or answer. They can be up-voted (but not down-voted) and flagged, but do not generate reputation. There's no revision history, and when they are deleted they're gone for good. And go through the tour page: And we're a little bit ...


10

As the comments above suggest, your answer was flagged as low-quality and therefore removed by the community (or by a moderator, perhaps. See why). I recall that I had posted a comment asking you to improve your answer, but you didn't pay attention. The up-votes you got were because it was a good suggestion (i.e. music). The down-votes were probably because ...


10

Because it was a review of a suggested edit on their own post, something the post's owner has a binding vote on.


10

There is no automatic rep loss when you reach a certain rep. There is no rep loss when you get flags declined. You did receive 2 downvotes today (23/1/18) as seen on your reputation history. Perhaps that's what you're referring to. Downvotes, if there are many on a post, is usually a sign that there is something odd about the post - and in this case, it's ...


8

It is probably due to your answer on "Should I use 'which' or 'that'?" having been accepted by the asker, and then un-accepted. An Accepted answer gives 15 points.


8

Very few high reputations at EL&U are built on what amount to slot-machine jackpots. Indeed, the 200-point daily limit for reputation is designed to prevent someone from gaining many hundreds of points from a single answer in a brief period of time. A timely, well-received answer may pile up 40 or 50 upvotes in a day, but only the first 20 of those votes ...


8

Your reputation may increase by 1 if an answer you downvoted is deleted. You can see all the individual events that affected your reputation by going to your Profile->Activity->Reputation.


7

Nobody knows why driveby downvoters vote the way they do because they leave no indication of their thinking. These people are a curse and a plague on this site because they either leave the OP no chance to improve a weak answer or they leave the impression that a strong answer is somehow lacking. This is a stark problem for a site that prides itself on ...


7

You received 2 reputation points by accepting the answer to your question but someone downvoted your post and you got -2 so it didn't show up (i.e. +2 -2 = 0). Your initial reputation was 101 then you received +10 from an upvote and your reputation became 111 then you accepted the answer and got +2 from that and then someone downvoted your post (-2) so the ...


6

Deleting posts which have a negative score and which have attracted a penalty thereby should restore the reputation lost. It's a little more complicated than that, because all votes are reversed. An answer which has a single downvote (score −1) will have incurred a penalty of 2 points. Deleting that answer will restore those points. It also restores ...


6

I tried to create a data.SE query to get this for you: Questions by users with high rep I arbitrarily chose the most recent 20, and rep >= 20,000.


6

NVZ's answer is correct and based on the principles of Stack Exchange, but my thoughts are too long to post in comments, so I'll add them as an answer. Let's face it, earning reputation is fun. As English Student pointed out in a comment, the site is designed to be gamified, and especially for users new to the site, there is a certain thrill to unlocking ...


6

A couple of questions were deleted. I've undeleted them for the moment as there is nothing immediately obvious to indicate why they were deleted. If something is drawn to moderators’ attention, or otherwise comes to light, they may disappear again. Those questions accounted for the majority of your loss, and you’re currently back to 6530. We may be able to ...


6

No, if you hit the downvote from a positive vote (+1), it does not return to the previous state (0), but the answer loses a vote (-1). If you want to cancel your vote, click on the same arrow you used in the first place. I think this is not a bug, but something the users should know.


6

Let me turn this around and ask: what impact does the existing -1 penalty for downvoting an answer have on user behaviour? Well, for a high-rep user who might be accruing (say) 3 upvotes a week from their historic answers, they can cast 30 downvotes on answers and their total rep remains unchanged. And they already have access to all the tools/privileges ...


5

You probably down-voted answers right after you reached 50 points, or you got some of your posts down-voted. Once the system notifies you about a new privilege, there isn't any way to remove the notification if you lose reputation. Probably, they could add a delay on notifications for new privileges, but then there would be users complaining they aren't ...


5

I don't understand why you want (or need) more than one vote. As @Lego Stormtrooper stated, you can always raise awareness (significantly) by offering a bounty on a question you like. If you think a question especially worthy, I've seen someone in chat (I don't go often, so I don't know how common this is) ask others to look at a good question and vote. ...


5

Well, you know, the help center says: Reputation is a rough measurement of how much the community trusts you; it is earned by convincing your peers that you know what you’re talking about. And scorekeeping keeps this Q&A wonder exciting and competitive and stuff as well. Point of the whole "we don't care about reputation points" from senior users is ...


5

We don’t need more LQQs. We need fewer. The best way to deprioritize the ones we get, and preempt getting any new ones is to downvote them. Consistently.


4

No, the maximum reputation you can ever earn for upvotes in a day is always capped at 200. It doesn’t matter whether you have lost reputation because of starting a bounty, or because people have downvoted you. So if you spent 100 on a bounty and also gained 200 by upvotes, that's all you could gain from those upvotes, and the order would not matter. You'd ...


4

From what I can see of your reputation, you do appear to have recovered the losses incurred from downvoting. With the baptism/christening question, your November 22 answer and your November 23 answer have both had their reputation penalties restored. Your "exact origin of the English language" question resulted in a net movement of reputation of zero on ...


4

One very important reason we have reputation points is to spend them. There are two main ways to spend them: bounties, and downvoting bad answers. With 15.2K rep you could give a prize to over 300 answers you thought were particular excellent. With 15.2K rep you could also downvote 15K answers you thought were particularly bad and potentially misleading. ...


4

"Bounty awards, accepted answers [what you and most of us call 'accepts'], and association bonuses are not subject to the daily reputation limit." From the Reputation section of the Help page, a useful resource for such queries. And the odd +3 comes from some combination of -2 for downvotes, +2 for accepted edits, +5 for upvotes on your questions... You can ...


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