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Grammar McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English. It turns out that the first three chapters of this classic 1998 grammar are available free on Google Books. The rest of the book is not. This seems to be very good marketing for University of Chicago Press, or whoever made this decision, because it gives a good and useful sample of what's in the book. ...


15

Historical Resources These are books of possible interest to people who are investigating word and phrase origins and want to know what meanings those words or phrase were said to have at various times in the past. Several of them do not show up in a direct Google Books search for them by title; I've run into the hidden ones by chance, while searching for a ...


11

Requests for resources that help the community in doing research for better questions and answers should be on-topic on ELU meta. This actually goes against our established SE policy that meta should be for questions about the main site, but let's make an exception here. We have a user base that are experts in the language, and who else would know about ...


10

Okay, I guess I should have added my answers here instead of above in the comments. So, I'll try again. Dictionary.com gives all the source references on one page, from English and slang to science, computing, and medical dictionaries, including History and Origin, all from specific dictionaries. It includes nearby words, related searches, and all words ...


9

Some of the BYU corpora provide the function you want. The BYU interface, and the concepts involved, may present you with a steep learning curve, but the tools there are powerful. For example, "words with which" a given word is "commonly used" are called "Collocates". If you go to the BYU corpora page (linked in the first paragraph of this answer) and ...


9

Mehhhhhhh, the name change isn't worth doing mass edits over. Nor is the change in URL, since you can click on most old URLs and be taken to the right page on the new site. There are many thousands of posts that link to oxforddictionaries.com (more specifically ~11k) and most of these links are still good and don't really need editing, since they just ...


8

Lexipedia: For the word you search, it has: Nouns Adverbs Verbs Adjectives Synonyms Antonyms Fuzzynyms


8

A very nice book which seems to be exactly what you want is the following: Penguin guide to synonyms and related words For a large number of words it analyses the nuances of the different synonyms. To show you the book structure, I scanned an example page. You can see that for each key word there's a list of synonyms (the full word list can be found in ...


8

Accessibility vs Discrimination I removed your pictures of text and requested an actual citation in their stead because text should be represented as text, not as pictures. It all comes down to accessibility. We’re trying to be accessible to as broad an audience as possible here. To that end, please do not post pictures of textual citations. Those cannot ...


8

The Lexico FAQs say that this is no longer possible in general: When searching in the English Dictionary, a toggle between US and UK English is no longer provided. We treat all of English as one dataset, but default with British and World English (which is equivalent to the UK Dictionary toggle selection). That means when you look up a word, you will most ...


7

When I took Old English as an undergrad we used Bright's Old English Grammar & Reader, which gives a decent start. I'm sure there are other beginning books you can find, perhaps on Amazon. Understand, though, that you immediately plunge into literature, and the survey of the grammar is designed to get you reading—for that is about all there is to do ...


6

YourDictionary.com also has example sentences using specific words Crossword helpers: One Across OjoHaven's Crossword Solver


6

If you are interested in particular in African American slang, two useful mainstream resources are Clarence Major, From Juba to Jive: A Dictionary of African-American Slang (1994) and Geneva Smitherman, Black Talk: Words and Phrases from the Hood to the Amen Corner (1994). Of the two, Majors's book is far more comprehensive and scholarly, but Smitherman's is ...


5

Green's Dictionary of Slang is a highly regarded and well-curated dictionary that I would feel safe calling "the best online slang dictionary" in a holistic sense. The website is easy to use, and with a paid subscription you can access its massive collection of citations, now available for free without a subscription. Even with GDoS, the granularity is not ...


5

The meaning of the question seems clear to me (I say this as there seems to be some confusion in the comments): get all synonyms of the word in question, and return the ones that are least commonly used. For a view on frequency, you could use Google's Ngrams viewer, which has a large corpus of book texts. This requires you to enter a comma-separated ...


5

Short answer: No, there's no perfectly correct dictionary, but the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) will probably get you what you want. Longer answer: There are a number of issues you bring up. 'Correct' for a dictionary is a strange usage. Does one typo make it 'incorrect'? Do a handful of oversimplifications make it 'incorrect'? I don't think you mean or ...


5

I have a few very reliable sources. Paper Rater Grammar Check Spell Check Plus Polish My Writing and finally Online Correction


5

tl;dr It was the simplest way to take the questions off Main. I've wondered about it, but perhaps one reason is that providing resource suggestions is about how to use the site: at least where to do your own research before asking a question. – Andrew Leach♦ I didn't find any reasons on ELU Meta for resources to be on-topic there. I also looked briefly ...


5

As a TEFL trainer, I always found R. Murphy's English Grammar in Use very useful, especially for new native Engish speaking teachers who didn't have much knowledge of their own grammar, as they learnt the names of tenses and constructions from it along with their students. http://www.cambridge.org/gb/cambridgeenglish/catalog/grammar-vocabulary-and-...


5

I recommend David Crystal's books, and especially his Cambridge Language Encyclopedias: The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language (3rd edition) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language (2nd edition) There's practically no overlap between these two, which are both available in folio-size paperback. The second one has a section on the English alphabet,...


5

Resource requests are "shopping list" questions, and are inherently unsuitable for all SE sites, not just EL&U. The reasons why are discussed on Meta and in a blog post by Jeff Atwood. Summary from the linked answer: They are open-ended; there is never one perfect answer to them. They outdate incredibly quickly. This was what turned me ...


5

Form the help centre's What types of questions should I avoid asking? page (I quoted only the relevant parts): What types of questions should I avoid asking? To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where … every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?” The resource request seems to ...


5

Google n-grams viewer provides some of that information. It shows the frequency with which 1, 2, 3 and 4 word combinations appear in a corpus of books, and additionally, shows the frequency against the year of publication of the books. One can also search for wildcards. mandatory * Or restricted to just the nouns: mandatory *_NOUN Strangely enough, ...


5

EL&U Meta's very own community-wiki-based question What good reference works on English are available? includes an answer headed "Historical Resources" that consists of sections devoted to early (pre–Samuel Johnson) general dictionaries and somewhat early (pre-1900) slang dictionaries. That answer is currently at 15 upvotes, so you have to ...


5

This answer is more relevant to English Language Learners and indeed it's well answered with lots of resources in the Meta on that site: Resources for learning English. Some of the resources mentioned there are free. The mechanics of migration and closing as a duplicate mean that leaving this question here as a signpost to ELL is worthwhile.


4

Lang-8.com is a good volunteer-based proofreading portal. It works on the principle of reciprocity: you proofread a guy or gal's posts in your language, they proofread writing in theirs. Furthermore, the more you've proofread, the higher your reputation is, and this also attracts readers and proofreaders.


4

Yes, please update the help center! In the comments to this question which was migrated to meta the OP correctly noted: When I typed "Where can I find a list ..." many other questions appeared in this format that were not closed. After reading the rules, I didn't see anything discouraging a user from asking for data, so I decided to post. – Trevor Hickey ...


4

Online, Merriam-Webster often has a "Synonym Discussion" under its Dictionary entries that directly compares and contrasts selected synonyms. For example, under the entry for swing it says in part SWING implies a movement of something attached at one end or one side. ⟨• the door suddenly swung open⟩ SWAY implies a slow swinging or teetering movement. ⟨• ...


4

Does this link help at all? I just downloaded it and it's working well. Free download Oxford collocations Dictionary


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