9

I agree to make the two synonyms. I'd prefer Irish-English to be the main tag and Hiberno-English to redirect to it, as it's perhaps a bit clearer, but don't mind too much either way.


7

As requested by tchrist: Unlike Hugo, I would prefer Hiberno-English as the main tag. Within the field of linguistics (as applied to Ireland and her languages in particular), Hiberno-English (or Hibernian English) and Irish English are actually two distinct terms with (slightly) different meanings: Hiberno-English is the variant of English that is ...


6

Tags are meant to provide useful categorizations of the questions. Honestly I think we could do without most or all of the existing language-name tags (I found tags for german, french, japanese, chinese, spanish, and italian just by looking at a few questions already tagged with translation). I don't think having a tag with the originating language ...


6

Any chance we could do this the other way around, i.e. make genitive the official tag and possessive a synonym? After all, a possessive is unarguably a type of genitive, but even in English, the genitive is not a type of possessive.


5

I think British English (BrE) is the official name for a family of dialects, accents, etc, of English and isn't a synonym for Standard English or Received Pronunciation. Example, in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, Chapter 1, section 3.1.2, a footnote says: some English-speaking Caribbean countries have rhotic accents and yet belong to the ...


5

I suggest proverb and saying are quite different both in meaning and use. A proverb is typically advice or an old expression of a common truth. If a new phrase were coined, such as "Make America Great" I would suggest it would not be labelled a proverb but a saying. A saying is a current phrase or short statement in popular use that typically has a meaning ...


4

You're probably right that saying and proverb are probably the same thing and so should be synonymized and merged. Then again, so too is epigram which I bet is my fault although I haven't looked. Those should all be in the plural, and there should be one tag to rule them all, one tag to find them. At the point it’s probably best I not mention gnome, ...


4

Concur - thie is English SE, and in English as you point out this is mostly a distinction without a difference. Also, as an added benefit, merging the tags might help people understand that possessive and genitive are (essentially) the same in English. Update: To take action on this, go to the following page and vote for making "genitive" a synonym of "...


3

Perhaps a mod has just gone through and actioned most of OP’s proposals – I’ve just checked over half the list, and in every case either one of the US/UK spellings is a synonym of the other, or they’re both synonyms of something else. All I can say is that if, say, capitalization existed, but capitalisation didn’t, I personally wouldn’t create the latter ...


3

Thanks, this should all be fixed now.


3

From my limited experience with these tags, they mean different things. "Confusables" is about words (or other things) that speakers or learners commonly confuse. For example, "what is the difference between 'deprecated' and 'depreciated'?" People asking these questions want to learn about some distinction so they can avoid making the mistake of confusing ...


2

Right now, style is a synonym for writing-style, which is the master. Meanwhile, formatting is gone, although format exists and matches 13 questions, mostly closed. One could make formatting the master and format the synonym, but I don’t find the tag particularly clear as things stand. This is because that searching for questions that happen to contain ...


2

I would just go ahead and switch all the singulars to plurals. There aren't that many of them. Eventually it may delete itself once it no longer has any questions that love it anymore. :)


1

I'm going to suck up the downvotes, just so I can post this as an answer (stolen without remorse from one of @JoeBlow's answers):


1

This has now been done: the master is in the plural for definite-articles and indefinite-articles.


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