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19

In and of itself, yes it is constructive. The "German" quotation mark style is not used in any version of English that I know of. However, it's not a substantive edit. If there are other formatting issues, then go ahead and make the edit, including the quotes. If that's the only issue, it's not worth it.


7

In the example presented by Claudiu—"Does the word cheese indicate something yellow?" I would follow the Chicago Manual of Style convention of italicizing words used as words: Does the word cheese indicate something yellow? I would do so not because this particular option is inherently superior to other ways of calling out a word used as word, but ...


7

My usage, as I put it in a post some time ago, In this medium, where writing and typography has to express speech and sounds, I use italics and boldface like this: I use plain italics only for citing examples and titles. Never for emphasis. I use boldface for emphasis. These are words that would be LOUD in my speech. I use bold italics for ...


7

Enabling MathJax As a moderator on Code Review who helped to push for MathJax to be activated there, I can say that the current Stack Exchange policy makes you work hard to justify it. Performance is a Feature, and Speed Still Matters, says Jeff Atwood, so they want pages to render quickly. MathJax is enabled per site, not per question, so they are ...


5

Mentions are generally in italics, and emphasis is indicated with bold. You can use can to indicate ability, reserving may to express permission, although in informal situations can generally works for may. Keeping the two typographical conventions distinct means that it’s possible to combine them when you want to emphasise a mention. So we have Give ...


3

Okay so I've done some house cleaning. programming-terminology has been merged into programming. I couldn't quite make out a meaningful difference between the two. suffix has been merged into suffixes. Not the other way round, mind you, since a) we generally prefer plural in tags, and b) some questions actually ask about several suffixes at once (-ic vs. -...


3

This is a feature. Whenever you visit a link, your browser remembers it. Then, if a website is programmed a specific way, a link you visited will be a different color than a link you didn't visit. (See here for more explanation.) You can see this here by clicking on only one of these links: Link 1 | Link 2 If you clear your browser history the links will ...


2

I agree that the ugly and freakily colored monospace that you get from backquotes makes next to no sense and is a real pain. In fact, I talk about that in this question. But one real exception is that we have no other ways of doing tables for a code block. And yes, there really are times that you want exact column placement. (S (NP (NP The dial) (...


2

I don't really think code is a good alternative for adding emphasis. Code is for code, not visually highlighting something. According to me, italics serve the purpose. They're called emphasis (<em>) in Web development too, so here you have it.


1

It depends entirely upon the context. When I'm emphasizing a single word or phrase as an example, I use italics. When I'm emphasizing a point, I use bold, as in: That is a very good phrasing choice. or CAPS That is a VERY good phrasing choice. When I'm quoting a person (real or hypothetical), source, or post, or I am making a usage / punctuation / ...


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