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In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of and ), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

4 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
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In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackEnglish/status/499093477230395392
3 deleted 2 characters in body
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In a comment on this [single-word-request] questionanswer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] question, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

In a comment on this [single-word-request] answer, the question was raised:

I'm … adding all my ideas to one answer. Is that the right way? Rather than generating many answers and letting each one fend for its own votes?

It's a good question. For questions that have concise, competing answers (I'm thinking in particular of [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests]), should we encourage users to break each idea into a separate answer?

It might help further separate wheat from chaff, and I don't think it should make a difference from a user's perspective: he'll get as much rep, if not more, by breaking out his responses (because all the people who would have voted for the composite answer will still vote for one of the component answers; and some people who would not have voted for the composite answer because it contained something they didn't like might vote for a "clean" component answer that doesn't contain that language).

Is there already an established or recommended best practice here?

2 added 1 character in body
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